Shelf life of dry food in mylar bags without climate control

keysbottles

New Member
Hey, I am a prepper and have a fare amount of food stored but I am running out of room. My question is how important is climate control for long term storage. I store rice, dry beans,, sugar, pasta etc. in mylar bags inside a plastic 5 gal bucket. If I began storing these in my shop with no h/ac will it damage the food? Thanks in advance for any advice. Don
 

jimLE

Member
Is the shop well insulated?
Does it have window's?
Can you open it up during the summer day's for ventelation,to keep the temp down?
Can you add something for heat during the winter?
 

twp

Admin, DuckDuckGo No Longer Recommended
Staff member
Hi Don. Some of the foods you list have a longer natural storage life than others. One thing to watch is whether the food, in its "raw" form, has oils used in the creation. Pasta may be such a food. It depends on the recipe used to make it. Some pasta does not use oils in making the base dough, but many do.

Oils/fats tend to oxidize if exposed to oxygen and this greatly reduces their storage life. There are three things you can do to address this problem;
First, store the food in sealed (airtight) containers,
Second, use oxygen absorbents in each container,
Third, keep the pasta as cold as possible, even to the point of freezing it.

You can (should) also rotate your stored foods (all of them) so that none stay in storage any longer than necessary. This is the reason behind the Prepper mantra; "Store what you eat, eat what you store". If you are storing foods simply because your found them in an online "List of Recommended Prepper Foodstocks", but you don't actually eat such food in your day-to-day life, then you are libel to find that it may be inedible when it comes time to really need that food.

Some basic food stocks have a Very long storage life, Sugar, Salt, and Baking Soda (Sodium Bicarbonate) are examples. Baking Powder, on the other hand, does NOT store well for long periods of time. You can find much information on the internet right now, which the 'net is still operational (don't count on it remaining in operation). Build your library of information now, whether hard copy or digital...

Also, if you are storing raw grains such as wheat, oats, etc, be aware that they may contain natural oils which will go rancid. For the same reason, flour made from grinding those grains will also contain those same oils and the grinding process will expose those oils to oxygen, resulting in a greatly reduced storage life. Better to store the raw grain and have a means of grinding them to flour ahttps://www.prepperboards.com/forums/just-my-opinion-by-jerry-d-young.39/t the time of usage.

You may also find more information in the sub-forum by member @Jerry D Young :
https://www.prepperboards.com/forums/just-my-opinion-by-jerry-d-young.39/

I expect other members will chime in with more information.
 

keysbottles

New Member
Is the shop well insulated?
Does it have window's?
Can you open it up during the summer day's for ventelation,to keep the temp down?
Can you add something for heat during the winter?
1/2" blue Styrofoam walls and roof
no windows
most days it remains closed
no heat or a/c
metal sides and roof
100F down to teens in winter
I live in North Arkansas

Under these conditions can I store dry food w/o damage? thanks

I do use oxygen absorbers
 

twp

Admin, DuckDuckGo No Longer Recommended
Staff member
The high temperature may be a point of concern. If the temperatures are expected to be high, consider using a fan to move cooler air into the space.

Can you do this? Conditionally, yes, with the understanding that high temperature needs to be handled. For dry foods, lower temperatures are much less of a concern.
 

WolfBrother

Well-Known Member
From a purely organic chemistry point of view - can you store dry food w/o damage under the conditions you mentioned - my opinion, probably not.

Ultra Violet radiation breaks carbon bonds. So any light getting to them will to some degree cause damage.

Heat increases the rate of chemical reaction and itself can break carbon bonds. So warm versus cool and hot versus warm will always increase the breakdown of the nutrients and taste and structure. Throw in oxygen and it speeds up.

Dry is very important. The dryer the less moisture there is available to assist the heat, oxygen, and lights work on the structure of your stored food.

There have been successful plantings of grains found in Egyptian tombs. Underground, cool, no light, limited oxygen, Saharan desert dry, all worked to the grain storages favor.

All of the above is my opinion. It is based on my years of prepping, studying prepping, and other experience/knowledge. This same opinion makes me add that the info and questions in the reply’s before mine are also spot on.

As a thought, if you can dig a root cellar under the shed you’ll have temperature and light taken care of. If the Mylar bags are sealed properly you’ll have external moisture issues taken care of and will have limited the amount of oxygen that can damage them.
 

jimLE

Member
I'm leaning in the direction of what twp said.heàt is harder on it then the cold.so if you can do something to keep the temp at 75F or lower during the summer.you'll be doing good.
i just remembered.there's seed vault's in which their kept very cold.but that's a constant and steady cold .
 
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