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Off Grid living

Discussion in 'Farming, Gardening, & Homesteading' started by Atlas, Mar 13, 2016.

  1. hypnos

    hypnos Well-Known Member Survival Class Instructor

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    I have heard of people getting free panels from highway departments. Apparently, any scratch or ding no matter how minor is enough for the government to replace them (if i understand right, they are mainly for the digital warning and notification signs) supposedly they will give them away to lower the cost of disposal.

    For me, being offgrid isn't difficult. I have lived that way, with and without electric or running water in backcountry northern Minnesota locations.

    The main issue is appliances, a laptop is a good investment and small solar set ups are more than adequate usually.

    For food, a sundanzer fridge and freezer can be purchased that are efficient, and easy to tie in to solar power.

    Hot water becomes the next issue. I will be installing a passive solar outdoor shower and sauna building when I have my property, and a tankless water heater that runs on LP for indoor use.

    Light isn't a big challenge even for smaller solar systems. But, having allot of passive heating helps allot, I'll be installing skylights, and a attached greenouse/sun room, for light and heat.
     
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  2. hypnos

    hypnos Well-Known Member Survival Class Instructor

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    If you have a wood stove, you have hot water. I had a 5 gallon stainless cook pot. Every morning I'd stoke the fire, put the pot on the stove, and haul in more firewood. By the time I was done splitting wood and making breakfast, Id take my "shower" shave , and use the remaining water to do my dirty dishes. The sink had a 5 gallon bucket as a water catch, the property had a handpump and well, with an electric pump tied in. I'd go snow shoe for a couple hours, do some reading, and head to town for a beer in the evening. Not a terrible way to live for a single guy!
     
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  3. Atlas

    Atlas Administrator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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    Heat exchangers can be added to wood stoves as well. I've heard this can be a good way to heat water, but I have no personal experience with it.
     
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  4. hypnos

    hypnos Well-Known Member Survival Class Instructor

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    I watched a YouTube video of a guy who had a portable woodstove in his Tipi. It had a water container that fit around the flue...genius.
     
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  5. twp

    twp Moderator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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    In years past, I used a wood fired water heater, set up in my kitchen next to the wood fired stove and plumbed to my water system. It held about 20 gallons and could be heated with about a cubic foot of wood, in small pieces. I can't find any pictures of the model I used, but it cost $110 in the 1980's.
     
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  6. Atlas

    Atlas Administrator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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    Was it one of GreenFrog's videos?
     

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