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home canning what you eat..

Discussion in 'Farming, Gardening, & Homesteading' started by jimLE, May 25, 2017.

  1. jimLE

    jimLE Well-Known Member

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    i started home canning in 2014..in which im glad that i did..on acount it means.that i dont have to cook what i want to eat,each n every time.just heat n eat. pluss,what i can dont have preservatives the store bought canned foods have.at this time.i have. chilli,beans n ham,beans n spam,beans n franks.chicken.and some other foods as well..next month,i'll be getting whats needed for chicken soup..and if all goes well.i'll get some other foods for canning as well..
     
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  2. Atlas

    Atlas Administrator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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    What recipes do you like?
     
  3. jimLE

    jimLE Well-Known Member

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    Different soups.chili. beans thats done up with different tapes of meat.i plan on canning chicken soup next month. .
     
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  4. Jerry D Young

    Jerry D Young Well-Known Member

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    I am not set up to can at the moment. But I remember helping my mother when I was a youngster. She did not can many combinations. It was mostly all individual items. She much preferred to use them to put together various recipes when needed. Meats, vegetables, broths, etc.

    She would use a few things as seasonings, such as bacon or ham in beans and such, but simply as an adjunct, not a primary ingredient.

    It can be very difficult to choose ingredients that have similar cooking times at the correct pressures to prevent some element not being processed well enough, or something just turning to mush.

    We used quite a few pint jars for broths, and meats especially, with a few other things in pints. Since there were 8 of us, it took a few quarts every meal to feed us all.

    Just my opinion.
     
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  5. jimLE

    jimLE Well-Known Member

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    true on how certain foods will turn to mush,if not careful.i use my experience from cooking and eating it then n there..and i also use use the canning directions at the same time..i've had only one complete failure since i started canning.and that was a batch of beef stew i made. all of it fumited. not sure what went wrong with it either.
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2017
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  6. Atlas

    Atlas Administrator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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    I'm hoping to get back into home canning soon. With some luck I'll be able to start producing enough this year to put some back. My first year at this property water killed me. My irrigation was the serious issue. Last year the deer ravaged my garden while I was away, just before things got going and too late to start over.

    Hopefully in a couple month here I'll be able to ask you some questions @jimLE!
     
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  7. jimLE

    jimLE Well-Known Member

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    I canned 29 pints of chicken soup on the 23rd of last month. But haven't checked yet.just to make sure it's all sealed and good yet.
     
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  8. Atlas

    Atlas Administrator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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    Chicken soup is something that I haven't ever done. When I make blackberry jam in a couple of months I will have to give that a try as well.
     
  9. jimLE

    jimLE Well-Known Member

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    I consider bowl of home made chicken soup real nice on a cool or cold day...i plan on doing the same with a turkey after thanksgiving.and they've gone on sale.
     
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  10. Atlas

    Atlas Administrator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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    That is another great idea. It's hard to think of soup when the temps are so high like they are right now, but putting some back is a smart move.
     
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  11. jimLE

    jimLE Well-Known Member

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    Oh it aint hard for me to think of soups.lol. I've got thin/watery chilli for everyday eating.thick chilli for frito chilli pie and chilli dogs..and who knows what else.in which each can be quickly heated in a microwave or on a stovetop.
     
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  12. twp

    twp Moderator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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    I'm doing dry, oven canning of things like rice, beans and rolled oats. I am using food jars, not standard canning jars. The seals are a rubber compound which responds to boiling by returning to roughly it's original shape.

    Not all food jars will have this kind of lid seal material, so be cautious.

    I test by boiling the lids only, for 10 minutes, inspecting the rubber seal itself and then testing the jar/lid seal by doing an empty can test. I heat the empty jar in the oven at about 250 F for an hour. The DRIED lid is then screwed on and the jar is allowed to cool. When cool, the lid should snap/click down like regular canning jars. Test this with your finger to ensure that it does have a dent.

    I find that some sauce jars (not all brands) work well for this.
    Once once you have found a brand with will re-seal, then try some rice or beans in a batch run.

    Wash and dry the jars (drying is critical).

    Put the lids in boiling water, now. Boil for at least 8-10 minutes.
    Remove and carefully dry the lids.

    Fill dry jars to 1/2 inch from the top with rice/beans.

    Place the jars, on a flat pan, in the 250 F oven for a full hour. The beans must be thoroughly heated.

    Remove jars and while still hot, screw the lids down on each one, tight.

    Wait until cooled and check for a seal on each one. The lid should snap/click downward.

    Of course, you can always use standard canning jars (like Ball) with ring seals. Same process, same times, same check for lid seal.
     
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  13. jimLE

    jimLE Well-Known Member

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    0904181301a.jpg 0904181301b.jpg
    I made onion juice from some onions that were given me.in which that went better then i figure,it would.
    the 1st pic.is whats left of the onion.and the 2nd is the onion juice.
     
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  14. twp

    twp Moderator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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    What do you do with the onion juice? I can certainly find uses for the onion pulp, but the juice has me stumped.
     
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  15. jimLE

    jimLE Well-Known Member

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    Im thinking there might be recipes that call for it.plus it probably can be used in the place of onion,when it comes to mixing ingredients togeather..
     
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  16. twp

    twp Moderator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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    Let me (us) know if you find some recipes which work with the onion juice. I really like using onion in my dishes.
    Plus, how do you store the juice? It probably does Not have a long shelf life and needs refrigeration or freezing.
     
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  17. Sally Rudd

    Sally Rudd Well-Known Member

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    I would dehydrate the used onion pulp. Waste not want not.:)

    I do a lot of preserving, canning and dehydrating, like Jim I like to know what's in my food, but mainly it saves room in my freezer. Last week I canned chicken thighs and minced beef. I usually can ingredients to make a meal, rather than complete meals, although I do can a lot of chilli.
     
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  18. jimLE

    jimLE Well-Known Member

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    I just did a search on onion juice.just to see if i can come with any recipe's for it.and yes i did,and more.it turns out.that it's good for hair care as well...

    Recipe's for onion juice.

    https://www.google.com/search?oe=ut...type&devloc=0#scso=_-tyOW_TWFMLisAXL0aigCg7:1

    P.s edit.
    I didn't even think about the possibility of using the pulp for anything. Untill it was to late.as for as storing it long term.im thinking home canniing it.but still need to look into that.
     
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  19. twp

    twp Moderator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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    Sally, is chili legal in Britain? :p:p:p
     
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  20. twp

    twp Moderator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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    Sounds like it would work for mosquito repellent... :rolleyes: Might put some people off too.

    Google(r) does not need to know what I am reading. :cool::cool: So I'll use that search string on a engine which doesn't track my search terms.

    [EDIT] it seems there is/was a onion juice commercial product:

    Who the Hell Uses Onion Juice? - Mark Bittman

    So there is a way to can it for long term storage.
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2018
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