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Blackberry recipes and picking tips

Discussion in 'Farming, Gardening, & Homesteading' started by Atlas, Jul 5, 2016.

  1. Atlas

    Atlas Administrator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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    We have blackberry bushes in abundance around my area, and I try to pick as many as I can every year. I thought it would be a good idea to have a thread on them. I'll share recipes and tips for picking them as I go through the season this year. The season here is generally late June through to early August, but it varies quite a bit by region. I'm always amazed at how quickly the season comes and then goes.
     
  2. Atlas

    Atlas Administrator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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    How to Clean Blackberries After Picking

    How to Clean Blackberries After Picking

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    Marie (Craftymarie)112 Followers
    72 Hubs

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    Plump juicy blackberries make wonderful fruits for delicious puddings, drinks and treats.


    We're very lucky to have a wonderful, big blackberry bush right at the end of our backyard which provides food for us and also for our visiting garden birds who love to share and indulge in our abundant crop of plump, sweet and juicy blackberries. Every year we get a harvest of these sweet and slightly tangy berries that are used fresh in homemade fruit pies, crisps, smoothies, ice cream, cake and cookie icing and frosting, fruit salads, juice and just as they are. And there are always so many that we have to end up freezing them too which gives us a great supply that we can dip into throughout the year.

    Being small and also prone to breaking easily once they are fully ripe and bursting with juice, they're fragile and not at all easy to clean well unless you know how. If you wash them too harshly, you'll end up with a wasted mush that no one will want to eat. The other problem with these is that there are a number of really teeny tiny bugs and even caterpillars that hide out in these fruits which you probably don't want to be biting in to. So even more reason for them to be getting a jolly good wash and clean! Here's how to wash them well without spoiling your harvest.

    Materials:

    • Freshly picked blackberries
    • Tap Water
    • Paper or Cloth Towel for Drying
    Instructions:

    1. Some people recommend rinsing blackberries in a colander or a sieve to clean them. This is definitely not what I recommend because I know from experience that you can still end up with little bugs remaining and hiding in the fruit if you try to wash them this way. What they need for a proper clean is a soak. So fill up a large bowl of cool water and place your berries in the bowl. If you put your berries in first, you can end up breaking some with the stream of water coming into the bowl.

    2. Once in the bowl, use your hands to gently swirl the berries around. This action should result in some bugs and unwanted bits floating to the top of the water. Sometimes I get caterpillars floating to the top. You can then easily see these to scoop them out and remove them.

    3. Carefully tip the blackberries into a sieve or a colander, dispose of the water and then repeat the soaking process again. I do a total of 3 good soaks before draining off in a colander or sieve for the last time.

    4. To dry your fruit, you can leave them to air dry for a while and then spread paper towels or a fabric cloth onto a large tray and carefully tip the berries on top. The paper or fabric will help to soak up some of the remaining moisture from washing. Note that the juice can stain a fabric towel or cloth.


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    5.
    The last process for me is to sort them out. I like to first pick out the mashy and broken berries to use in smoothies since they are going to get mashed up in the blender anyway or for using as frosting or icing for baking or for jam and preserves. Nice, whole fresh ones will be put aside to use in fruit pies or crisps, trifles or fruit salads - whatever I want to make.

    Whatever I do not need will be frozen in bags of around 20-30 berries. They freeze well and, though are a little mushy once defrosted, are perfectly good enough to use in recipes such as apple and blackberry crisp crumble, smoothies, homemade ice cream, and cupcake frosting throughout the year. I hope you have found this lens or article to be useful because it has been written with care. The image here shows my homemade blackberry ice cream - yum!
     
  3. David

    David Member

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    My favorite berry/fruit is black berries. I have many fond memories of family outing picking them for pies and jams. There are so many in nor cal.. I think most never get eaten by anything. They are a true natural bounty around here. Glad to see you are well versed with these. I've even heard that the leaves have medicinal uses.

    Sent from my SM-G900T using Tapatalk
     
  4. Atlas

    Atlas Administrator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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    Yeah, there are so many around my house that never get picked. Next summer I'll try a little harder to get more, but I was so busy.
     
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