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Batteries for solar installations

Discussion in 'The Learning Center' started by Atlas, Jan 6, 2019.

  1. Atlas

    Atlas Administrator Staff Member

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    Within this thread I hope that we can share some information and resources about batteries for solar systems. If you have any good links to share or thoughts on the different types of batteries for any size of system lets include it here. I will also start another thread for panels, charge controllers, etc... elsewhere.
     
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  2. Atlas

    Atlas Administrator Staff Member

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  3. Atlas

    Atlas Administrator Staff Member

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  4. Atlas

    Atlas Administrator Staff Member

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  5. twp

    twp Administrator Staff Member

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    I've always read that Nickle-Iron cells were the better choice. That is based on their ability to handle deep discharge and recharge AND overcharging. They can be completely discharged without damage to the cell chemistry or structure. That is NOT true for Lead-Acid cells, Nickle-Metal Hydride cells or for Lithium cells.
    The downside is cost, they are much more expensive.
    A big brand name is Iron Edison. There may be other manufacturers but I didn't see them in a web search.
     
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  6. Atlas

    Atlas Administrator Staff Member

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    The Iron Edison batteries are top notch. I'd love to go with them for my install. At $10 an amp hour they are pricey, but 30 year battery life is amazing.
     
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  7. Atlas

    Atlas Administrator Staff Member

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  8. soyer38301

    soyer38301 Well-Known Member

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    Too rich for my blood. Waiting until warmer weather to mount my panels on my pole barn. Have everything i need, except batteries...

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
     
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  9. Atlas

    Atlas Administrator Staff Member

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    They sure are expensive, aren't they?

    What panels, charge controller and inverter do you have?
     
  10. soyer38301

    soyer38301 Well-Known Member

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    I just picked up a renogy 1600 watt system, it is their own branded device. Can be expanded but would need a different controller.

    Right now I'm planning on just running the lights and a few other things in the pole barn. 24vdc led lighting, so won't need a big battery bank to start with.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
     
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  11. Atlas

    Atlas Administrator Staff Member

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    Very nice. I'll do another thread on that here soon.
     
  12. twp

    twp Administrator Staff Member

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    You can always start with recycled Lead-Acid cells. They don't last as long and require regular maintenance, but the cost factor may make them usable.
    A step up are the "golf cart" batteries, still Lead-Acid, but with thicker and wider lead plates.
     
  13. Atlas

    Atlas Administrator Staff Member

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    I started with some automotive starting batteries, which didn't last very long. A couple of deep cycles and they were toast. I then went with 4 Wal-Mart deep cycle golf cart batteries and they lasted quite a while, 10 years or so. In 2016 I switched over to Optima Yellow Top batteries due to a friends discount deal and haven't been all too happy. I hope to switch over to something better in the near future. Having a sealed battery is considerably better for the ham shack, as they can be inside and all of the wire runs can be fairly short.
     
  14. twp

    twp Administrator Staff Member

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    Yep, automotive batteries have thin lead plates and a deep discharge will literally eat holes in those plates which cannot be repaired. They are for light usage and frequent recharge, exactly as they are used in starting a car.
     
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