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Bartering

Discussion in 'The Main Board' started by Atlas, Jun 28, 2018.

  1. Atlas

    Atlas Administrator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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    twp likes this.
  2. Atlas

    Atlas Administrator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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  3. Atlas

    Atlas Administrator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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    In this article Paranoid Prepper makes a great argument about precious metals and bartering.
    I tend to agree with him. Making guesses based on guesses gets pretty iffy. My preparedness plan does not assume that I will have any help or anyone to barter with what so ever. If it does work out then all the better, but I prefer not to rely on it.
     
  4. twp

    twp Moderator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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    Personally, I plan on catering to peoples addictions. Alcohol and tobacco are the only two items which I will consider stocking for barter. In a long term crisis, alcohol can be produced from grains and tobacco can be grow if one has the seeds.

    Pre-event, I think that having a few (not a whole lot, say a couple dozen) of the tiny bottles of various alcoholic drinks (one shot each) will not take up much space or add much weight. Tobacco pouches, while not cheap, are available now. They are sealed and will keep for at least several months or longer. I would add some rolling papers also.

    As in all barter items, it makes sense to Not let it be known that you have more than what you show to the other party.

    The bottles of booze don't need to be rotated, but the tobacco will go stale and I would rotate stock about once a year. I would keep the older pouches though, it might be stale, but "beggars can't be choosers" as the saying goes.

    All of the above being said, I would not devote much money or storage space to these two items, perhaps a cubic foot box containing both items.
     
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  5. lonewolf

    lonewolf Well-Known Member

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    no bartering for me, I don't believe it will be safe enough for a LONG long time.
     
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  6. Atlas

    Atlas Administrator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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    That might be true, but would you care to explain why for us?
     
  7. lonewolf

    lonewolf Well-Known Member

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    in a societal collapse even going out of the front door wont be safe for a long long time, I mean years not months.
     
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  8. twp

    twp Moderator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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    lonewolf; history proves that to be true. My long term plans include a period of high danger but also expect to eventually stabilize and make trade/barter possible again.
     
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  9. lonewolf

    lonewolf Well-Known Member

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    possibly, but by the time that comes to pass I've either learned to repair or make new ones or learned to live without it, I plan to live a very simple and basic lifestyle post collapse.
     
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  10. twp

    twp Moderator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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    Long term, my plans include an attempt to rebuild some kind of society. I acknowledge that I may not live long enough to reach that point. I have some knowledge and want to put it to use, not just for myself, but for that new society.

    My intent is to reduce the period of reversion. More than a couple of generations of that and we will be back to subsistence living and telling tales of the "old ones" around a camp fire.
     
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  11. lonewolf

    lonewolf Well-Known Member

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    we will be using "subsistence living" here once the power goes off, not many people these days know how to live without electricity and i'm expecting the mortality rate to be huge.
     
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  12. Atlas

    Atlas Administrator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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    I too plan on subsistence living in many post disaster scenarios. Luckily where I live it is very easy to grow food, and the forest is a pretty good provider as well.

    I definitely plan to lay low and watch it blow over if I can.
     
  13. twp

    twp Moderator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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    In any event which impacts the entire country or more, I also expect the die-off to be large. I live in a town of 230,000+ population and there is nowhere near enough farm area to support even a fraction of them. We have massive food imports from California and the states east of us.

    While the immediate area has enough river water flow to support agriculture, it has been declining for some time as more houses were built.

    The mountain ranges which surround us are dry also. There are springs, some of them perennial, but not a lot of them. That means there are a few habitable locations. They won't be safe until the population falls drastically.

    The forests are high desert type, susceptible to fire. We've had a few local forest fires in the last decade which threatened the city itself. In a crisis, there probably will not be fire protection available, period.

    It is a bleak picture in terms of long term survival. Short term... Better situation if you are prepared. Long term, bugging out looks like the better choice, IMO.
     
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  14. lonewolf

    lonewolf Well-Known Member

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    I live in a farming area with a low population, most city people would think its "the middle of nowhere" and I have this said to me, and its not a tourist area.
     
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  15. Atlas

    Atlas Administrator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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    Do you worry about the "golden hoarde" where you live @lonewolf?
     
  16. lonewolf

    lonewolf Well-Known Member

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    no I don't, Brits aren't made that way, even in "the Blitz" in WW2 it was only children that were evacuated, people over here will sit and wait to be rescued.
     

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