Preps Article - Bulk Grain – Where to Get it, How to Store it

twp

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links to grain sources and instructions on storage.

https://commonsensehome.com/bulk-grain/
Bulk grains are a classic preparedness storage food because they have great shelf life. Whether you're buying quinoa, rice or other gluten free grains, or stocking up on wheat berries for delicious homemade bread, buying bulk grain is a great way to save money, too.

Typically, “bulk grains” refers to whole grains that have not been cracked or ground, but sometimes companies include flours and cereals. Food prices are only likely to increase, so stocking up your pantry now makes sense.
I would add to the list of sources, your local animal feed store(s). They may offer high sized bulk grains but they may also need some cleaning on your part. Be aware that bulk grains may have insects. You can kill adult insects by using an airtight container and adding dry ice. Insect eggs may hatch but the CO2 will kill them almost immediately. DO NOT USE INSECTICIDES!!!!!:eek:

Depending on where you live, you may be able to buy bulk grains directly from the farmer. These will NEED cleaning and careful attention to storage and insects.
 
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jimLE

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Here's something that I came across this morning.i haven't been buying mylar bags due to funds.but because of the article. I'm thinking that I better start buying them.

Mylar Bags vs. Vacuum Sealing for Food Storage [Which is Best?]​


https://www.primalsurvivor.net/mylar-bags-vs-vacuum-sealing/
 

twp

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Excellent comparison of food storage. DO NOTE that standard vacuum sealing bags (not mylar) are rated poorest, even though they are the cheapest to buy. Glass jars have a higher buy-in cost, but should last decades, with care.
 

WolfBrother

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Suggest vacuum bags filled in immediately usable quantities stored in a sealed larger Mylar bag. Preferably vacuum sealed also.

This way you open up a 5 gallon bucket and instead of 5 gallons of beans or whatever you have 5 gallons of 1 pound vacuum sealed bags. Possibly a mix products instead of just one thing.
 

Jerry D Young

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I have made a point to not use mylar bags for any food storage at all. For a long time. Initially just a general, unsubstantiated distrust. The last several years based on reported failures of the system under several different types of usage. All of which are the recommended methods for foods that are seen in prepper magazines, blogs, vlogs, websites, etc.

As twp said, glass jars are good. Would need to lay in a large quantity of gallon jugs to make it reasonable storage space. Or, my preferred method, pay the price for grains put up commercially or by LDS in metal cans with either an oxygen absorber, or DIY dry pack cans using a individual or group purchased can sealer.

I will be checking out a much cheaper version of can sealers as soon as I come up with the money to get one. I will do an evaluation and post what I find out as soon as I can.

And the following is very important, as it is counter to 99% of preppers' opinions.

Just my opinion.
 

twp

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Jerry, RE can sealers, how can we address the need for a source for the empty cans themselves?

I'd like to see a way to re-use metal cans, but I've not found or heard about this in the past.

In a Post-SHTF scenario, those metal cans may not be available, but plenty of used cans will still exist. How to re-use them is the question.
 

Jerry D Young

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Need a flanger or reflanger to put a new flange on the can once the top rim is cut off. The cut needs to be pretty precise. Then, the can is put in the flanger and the top edge of the can is folded outward to 90° from the can. Then the can can be filled, a new end put in place, and then the can with new end is run through the can sealer.

An outfit called Gering & Son used to make a reflanger for the LDS and home can sealing people. They also made a can sealer. May still be able to get their can sealer new from them, but they quit making the reflanger.

I have found commercial ones that are production machines, but they are very expensive. However, there are a few that are priced in line with the quality can sealers. I am thinking, however, that one made to put a flange on sheet metal ducts might be adapted. They are not always all that expensive.

To be honest, if I had a place to work and some tools I believe I could make one. It would not be high production, but I think it would work okay.

Several smallish enclosed bearings would be the key. The rest is simply putting some metalwork together. The aluminum extrusions like those used to make many of the 3D printers would work. Need a somewhat flexible base pad for the can to sit on, and then a plate is clamped down on the inside of the can to hold it in place. The flanger is then cranked around the can, folding over the edge in three or four stages until it is at the 90° angle.

I will keep searching. I have found a flanger for about $2,500, which, given it could reflange #10 cans probably 3 to 4 times, would pay for itself once you started using the goods put up in the cans. Probably not until the apocalypse, but then it does not really matter. Having the machine so the cans could be reused would make it invaluable.

Just my opinion.

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