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An Interesting Observation.

Discussion in 'Farming, Gardening, & Homesteading' started by Sally Rudd, Aug 21, 2018.

  1. Sally Rudd

    Sally Rudd Member

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    I sowed some late courgette(zucchini) and needed to transplant a couple. They were all much the same size when I moved 2 of them to another planter. 2 weeks later, the difference is obvious. The ones on the right were transplanted.
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    I'm a visual type of person and now I see the difference sowing and growing in situ has made, I'm wondering if it's worth the effort of starting some things off in pots to get an early start at all.
     

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  2. Atlas

    Atlas Administrator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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    That is an interesting thing right there. Do you think that it was stress from the move? Or what else might be the cause of this?
     
  3. Sally Rudd

    Sally Rudd Member

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    I think that's the problem. The compost, and environmental conditions are identical and they have both been watered the same. I never really noticed it before as this is the first time I have seen the difference side by side.
     
  4. Atlas

    Atlas Administrator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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    It is kind of funny that a plant can get stressed out, but they sure do. Maybe you could try singing to it, or possibly just playing the radio for it. I hear that works pretty good.

    I usually take plants from seed to 3" pots, then they go directly into the ground. We have a very long growing season here, so that makes this quite a bit easier for me. I prefer to handle the plants as little as possible.
     
  5. Sally Rudd

    Sally Rudd Member

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    If I were to sing to them they would curl up and die! I can hit a bum note beautifully.:rolleyes:
    I only move them as I sowed 4 seeds and they all came up:)
     
  6. Atlas

    Atlas Administrator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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    That's way better than I usually do. I'm about 75% success rate at this point, and that's before the deer get involved. They decimated my garden this year. I am saving for a better fence now, hopefully next year will be a better year.
     
  7. twp

    twp Moderator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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    I notice some chlorosis (yellowing) on the transplants. That can be due to several causes, see the link. Root damage is one of the possible causes and that is likely to happen in a transplant operation.
     
  8. Sally Rudd

    Sally Rudd Member

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    Yep, it's all down to transplanting. It's the first time I've actually seen the effects side by side, that's what struck me. Nothing like a show and tell to make a point.
     
  9. Atlas

    Atlas Administrator Staff Member Survival Class Instructor

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    That is a great article on chlorosis, which leads me to another subject. Has anyone ever done a test on their soil to see what is in it? There are a few home kits, but you can also send a sample to a lab for fairly cheap. I have not done it on this property I am at currently, but the last several properties i have. They tell you exactly what your soil contains, and from there you know what to add. A few years back I was hanging out at a local farm supply place and they turned me on to it.

    Like I said, I don't really have a green thumb, so I need all the help I can get!
     
  10. Sally Rudd

    Sally Rudd Member

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    I have only tested the acidity of the soil before. But then I've always sought out the old gardeners who had the best growing plots and taken my lead from them. Maybe not terribly scientific, but experience counts for something.
    Next season I am hoping to have a veg garden again, rather than just a few planters.
     
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