2020 Forest Fire Season

Atlas

Administrator
Staff member
That it is.

I was told an interesting story the other day. They are shutting down power plants with no way to recover the electricity generation output in other places. That is why there was roving blackouts before the fires.

https://www.latimes.com/environment...alifornia-might-let-four-gas-plants-stay-open

So now I wonder if the PSPS thing doesn't have something to do with that, because you know I don't believe anything these rats say anymore and if they all swear it is only because of fires I wonder why no one argues it.
 

twp

Admin, DuckDuckGo No Longer Recommended
Staff member
What motives might there be for the PSPS mandate? Power and control? Sheeple training?
 

twp

Admin, DuckDuckGo No Longer Recommended
Staff member
What a coincidence... Fires starting close to the highways, in all three coastal states? Arson anyone?
 

twp

Admin, DuckDuckGo No Longer Recommended
Staff member
Wow, when I got up this morning, we had orange skies, itchy eyes and runny noses. This is the worst smoke I've seen this year. I'm going to be using a wet cloth over my face tonight.
 

twp

Admin, DuckDuckGo No Longer Recommended
Staff member
Funny how global warming hovers the globe - but only lands in California

https://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2020/09/funny_how_global_warming_hovers_the_globe__but_only_lands_in_california.html

Since the entire press searchable on Google repeats the global warming blather, I decided to consult some real science and got quite a different picture, and not a flattering one to Newsom.

According to the Cal State University fire scientists, whose website indicates they are the only ones studying this, the number one reason for the increased incidence of California's fires is:

1. FOREST “FUEL LOADS” ARE HIGH.
The forest floor grows dense with flammable dead branches and brush when it’s not cleared out, either manually or when burned. In many parts of California’s wildlands, these forest "fuels" have not burned or been cleared for decades, due in part to fire suppression policies by state and federal agencies.
"One of the reasons we're observing more fires is because of 100 years of poor Forest Service policy where we didn't allow prescribed fire or wildfires to burn," says Craig Clements, Ph.D., director of the San José State University's Fire Weather Research Laboratory and associate professor of meteorology and climate science.
To understand the history and context of wildfire suppression in the U.S., you have to go back to the Great Fires of 1910. After these enormous wildfires ravaged three million acres across Idaho, Montana and Washington, the then-young U.S. Forest Service made it their singular policy to stop fires whenever possible.
It wasn’t until the 1970s that policy shifted from fire control to fire management, with the recognition that some fire—including prescribed burns—is a necessary part of the wildland ecosystem. But decades of still-unburned forest means today’s wildlands are dense with vegetation that’s ready to spark. Drought conditions have only intensified the impending threat in many parts of the state. (See below for more on this.)
In a 2009 report, Chris Dicus, Ph.D., professor of wildland fire and fuels management at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, wrote that before the Gold Rush, there were approximately 50 to 70 trees per acre in California’s forestlands. Today, there are more than 400 trees per acre.
Another contributing factor to the growing forest fuel load is the increasing number of dead or dying trees caused by bark beetle infestations. These insects, along with the drought, are responsible for killing 129 million trees across California since 2010, quite literally adding fuel to the fire.
 

twp

Admin, DuckDuckGo No Longer Recommended
Staff member
Last edited:

twp

Admin, DuckDuckGo No Longer Recommended
Staff member
Reno smoke is getting thicker, smell is more noticeable. I'm coughing more too.
Nasty. I'm going to a wet rag over my nose/mouth now.
 

WolfBrother

Member
Reno smoke is getting thicker, smell is more noticeable. I'm coughing more too.
Nasty. I'm going to a wet rag over my nose/mouth now.
Saw a bubba engineered air filter. Get a box fan, get an Air conditioner filter rated to take smoke out, duct tape it to the intake side of the fan, run the fan. Should somewhat help interior air quality. YMMV
 
  • Like
Reactions: twp

twp

Admin, DuckDuckGo No Longer Recommended
Staff member
@WolfBrother, thanks for the idea. Will work on it next week.
 
Top